MA in History

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MA in History Program Overview

 

A Flexible Learning Experience Tailored to You

 

Our MA in history program is offered in an asynchronous, 100% online format that allows you to complete coursework anywhere, 24/7.  This affordable program can be completed in as little as two years and the GRE is not required for admission. You can also select a thesis or non-thesis option for your degree. For the thesis option, you’ll complete 24 credit hours of coursework followed by a 6-credit thesis. The non-thesis option devotes all credit hours to coursework and includes written and oral exams.


Vast Coverage of American and World History

 

History isn’t just about the past—it helps us understand the people and events that shaped the world we live in today. Our online Master of Arts in History enables you to dive deeply into consequential historical topics ranging from the Industrial Revolution to the Third Reich. Designed with your future success in mind, our MA in history program equips you with broadly applicable skills that will prepare you to become a leader in any profession, including the ability to:

 

·         Write and speak authoritatively

·         Think critically

·         Analyze comprehensively

 

A Future Full of Potential

 

A graduate degree brings with it the potential for career advancement. In fact, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states that master’s degree holders earn an average of 20% more than those who have a bachelor’s degree alone. With the new credential and skills you’ll gain in our program, you’ll be able to pursue a variety of academic and professional paths, including:

 

·         Doctoral-level studies

·         Law school

·         Government

·         Management

·         Teaching

·         Law enforcement

 

History Core Thesis Option

30 credits. NOTE: Thesis students must complete 24 hours (8 courses) from the list below and 6 hours of thesis work. Thesis students must successfully complete and defend their thesis.

Courses
Duration
Credits
HIST 6301 - Industrial Revolutions
16 weeks
3
Comparative study of processes of industrialization in North America, western Europe, Russia/USSR, and east Asia. Topics for discussion include the role of the state, development of new social structures and industrial cultures, and possible preconditions for industrialization.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2022 Whole Spring 2024
HIST 6302 - Democratization
16 weeks
3
Trans-national comparison of processes of democratization and political modernization. Topics will include forms of democratic states, as well as why some states develop fascist, authoritarian, or Communist structures.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2023
HIST 6336 - Third Reich and Holocaust
16 weeks
3
Historical literature and issues related to Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Summer 2022 Whole Summer 2024
HIST 6341 - Native North America: Contact to Removal
16 weeks
3
This course examines American Indian history from first European contact to the eventual forced removal of many Native American communities west of the Mississippi River in the 1830s and 1840s. Special focus will be placed on the different Native communities in North America and how the continent’s Indigenous people changed and persisted in the face of dramatic change.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2022
HIST 6343 - American Revolution
16 weeks
3
The course will examine the American Revolution and how it affected the many peoples and communities throughout the present-day United States. The goal of this course will be to examine the many causes and consequences of the American Revolution and how the legacy and memory of these events still shape America.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2023
HIST 6344 - Civil War
16 weeks
3
Historical literature relating to major developments and problems in some aspects of the American Civil War.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2022
HIST 6345 - Reconstruction
16 weeks
3
Historical literature relating to major developments and problems in some aspects of Reconstruction period.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Summer 2023
HIST 6346 - Progressive Era
16 weeks
3
This course will examine the reform movements of the Progressive Era. The class explores the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the period (1900-1919) with emphasis on the links between them.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2023
HIST 6347 - The 1920s
16 weeks
3
The course will examine historical literature related to the 1920s with emphasis on gender, race, politics, and cultural shifts.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2023
HIST 6348 - World War I
16 weeks
3
World War I was a global conflict in every sense of the term. All corners of the Earth played a major role. While traditionally studies of World War I have focused on Europe, this class will take a much more expansive view to show how this was truly the end of an era in World History. While beginning in Europe, we will quickly move on to Asia to discuss the rise of Japan and the beginnings of Japanese expansion that would help drag the world eventually into another world war. Then focus will shift to the way the war affected European colonies across the globe, especially India and in Africa, beginning the independence movements in many of those areas. And, of course, the war in the Middle East would come to shape relations between the West and the Muslim world for the next hundred years. Finally, the American Genocide and the Russian Revolution were directly related to the changes brought on by the war, and this course will study them in detail. Through archival movies and the writings of the actors involved, this course will help students to understand why World War I shaped the next century of history and still has a major effect on us today.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2022 Whole Spring 2024
History Core Non-Thesis Option

30 credits. NOTE: Non-thesis students must take and pass a written and oral exam during the semester of graduation.

Courses
Duration
Credits
HIST 6301 - Industrial Revolutions
16 weeks
3
Comparative study of processes of industrialization in North America, western Europe, Russia/USSR, and east Asia. Topics for discussion include the role of the state, development of new social structures and industrial cultures, and possible preconditions for industrialization.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2022 Whole Spring 2024
HIST 6302 - Democratization
16 weeks
3
Trans-national comparison of processes of democratization and political modernization. Topics will include forms of democratic states, as well as why some states develop fascist, authoritarian, or Communist structures.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2023
HIST 6336 - Third Reich and Holocaust
16 weeks
3
Historical literature and issues related to Nazi Germany and the Holocaust.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Summer 2022 Whole Summer 2024
HIST 6341 - Native North America: Contact to Removal
16 weeks
3
This course examines American Indian history from first European contact to the eventual forced removal of many Native American communities west of the Mississippi River in the 1830s and 1840s. Special focus will be placed on the different Native communities in North America and how the continent’s Indigenous people changed and persisted in the face of dramatic change.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2022
HIST 6343 - American Revolution
16 weeks
3
The course will examine the American Revolution and how it affected the many peoples and communities throughout the present-day United States. The goal of this course will be to examine the many causes and consequences of the American Revolution and how the legacy and memory of these events still shape America.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2023
HIST 6344 - Civil War
16 weeks
3
Historical literature relating to major developments and problems in some aspects of the American Civil War.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2022
HIST 6345 - Reconstruction
16 weeks
3
Historical literature relating to major developments and problems in some aspects of Reconstruction period.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Summer 2023
HIST 6346 - Progressive Era
16 weeks
3
This course will examine the reform movements of the Progressive Era. The class explores the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the period (1900-1919) with emphasis on the links between them.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2023
HIST 6347 - The 1920s
16 weeks
3
The course will examine historical literature related to the 1920s with emphasis on gender, race, politics, and cultural shifts.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2023
HIST 6348 - World War I
16 weeks
3
World War I was a global conflict in every sense of the term. All corners of the Earth played a major role. While traditionally studies of World War I have focused on Europe, this class will take a much more expansive view to show how this was truly the end of an era in World History. While beginning in Europe, we will quickly move on to Asia to discuss the rise of Japan and the beginnings of Japanese expansion that would help drag the world eventually into another world war. Then focus will shift to the way the war affected European colonies across the globe, especially India and in Africa, beginning the independence movements in many of those areas. And, of course, the war in the Middle East would come to shape relations between the West and the Muslim world for the next hundred years. Finally, the American Genocide and the Russian Revolution were directly related to the changes brought on by the war, and this course will study them in detail. Through archival movies and the writings of the actors involved, this course will help students to understand why World War I shaped the next century of history and still has a major effect on us today.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Spring 2022 Whole Spring 2024

Admission Requirements

 

Regular Admission Requirements

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.
  • GPA of 3.0 or better in the last 60 credit hours of coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree.
  • Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can speak to the applicant's abilities, skills, and motivation (letters from professors and supervisors preferred).
  • Writing sample: Applicants may submit an undergraduate paper (preferred) or a 500-word essay expressing what they wish to accomplish in the program.
  • 18 semester credit hours of combined upper- and lower-division history courses. Applicants lacking the 18 hours might be required to complete leveling courses.

Conditional Admission Requirements

Applicants who do not meet the regular admission requirements may be considered for conditional admission. The Department will assign conditional admission by determining if the applicant's letters and writing skills are suitable for success in the graduate program. Evaluation of materials is done on a case-by-case basis. If the applicant is conditionally admitted, he/she must then earn a "B" grade or better in the first 12 graduate hours.

  • Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.
  • GPA between 2.5 – 3.0 in the last 60 credit hours of coursework leading to the baccalaureate degree.
  • Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can speak to the applicant's abilities, skills, and motivation (letters from professors and supervisors preferred).
  • Writing sample: Applicants may submit an undergraduate paper (preferred) or a 500-word essay expressing what she or he wishes to accomplish in the program.
  • 18 semester credit hours of combined upper- and lower-division history courses. Applicants lacking the 18 hours might be required to complete leveling courses.
  • OTHER EVIDENCE:
    • Applicant's performance in upper-level history courses and other comparable upper-level courses that stress writing/analysis/research (such as English, philosophy, and political science) will be used to evaluate an applicant's abilities.
    • Grades of "B" or better reflect potential success in graduate-level work.

Program Options
Candidates for the Master of Arts in History must complete 30 credits of graduate work. They may choose between the thesis option and the non-thesis option.

 

  • Students who elect to write a thesis will complete 24 credit hours in history and 6 credit hours upon acceptance of a thesis. Thesis students must successfully complete and defend their thesis.
  • Students who elect the non-thesis option will complete 30 credit hours in history.

 

MA degree candidates who select the non-thesis option must pass an oral and a written examination. MA degree candidates who elect to write a thesis must pass an oral defense of their thesis. There is no general foreign language requirement for the master’s degree in history. However, when mastery of a language is requisite to purposeful study, the demonstration of language skills may be required. For example, candidates writing a thesis on a topic in Latin American history must demonstrate the ability to comprehend written Spanish with reasonable accuracy. 

 

 

Official Transcripts

Official copies of transcripts must come directly from the school in a sealed envelope and can be mailed to:

 

UT Permian Basin
Office of Admissions
4901 E. University Blvd.
Odessa, TX 79762

 

Official transcripts in electronic format can be sent to admissions@utpb.edu.

 

Supporting Documents

All supporting documents related the graduate program should be sent to the Graduate Studies Office:

 

UT Permian Basin
Graduate Studies
4901 E. University Blvd.
Odessa, TX 79762-0001

 

Electronic versions of supporting documents may be emailed to gradstudies@utpb.edu

 

Application Fee

 

The application fee is $40.

 

If you have any questions regarding the admission requirements, please email gradstudies@utpb.edu.

Professor of History
Department Chair
Head of the History Graduate Program
martinez_a@utpb.edu

Dr. Martinez-Catsam received her degrees from Texas A&M University (BA), St. Mary's University in San Antonio (MA), and Texas Tech University (PhD). Dr. Martinez-Catsam's active research agenda emphasizes the Gilded Age and Progressive Eras, focusing on newspapers, epidemics, and the Mexican American experience. Her recent publications and current projects explore community responses to early 20th-century epidemics.

Professor of History
Kathlyn Cosper Dunagan Professor in the Humanities
catsam_d@utpb.edu

Dr. Catsam received his degrees from Williams College (BA), the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (MA), and Ohio University (PhD). He is also senior research associate at Rhodes University in South Africa. His work on race and politics focuses on the U.S. and southern Africa. Dr. Catsam’s internationally recognized publications also explore the intersection of politics and sports.

Associate Professor of History
Dean of Student Success
frawley_m@utpb.edu

Dr. Frawley received his degrees from Pennsylvania State University (BA), Edinboro University of Pennsylvania (MA), and Louisiana State University (PhD). His research and publications focus on the American South with a concentration on economic issues. Dr. Frawley’s current research projects explore industry in the antebellum South on the eve of the Civil War, as well as penitentiaries as centers of industry during the pre-and post-war South.

Associate Professor of History
spickermann_r@utpb.edu

Dr. Spickermann received his degrees from the University of California, Berkeley (BA) and the University of Michigan (MA, PhD). His research emphasizes modern Germany, with his current projects examining the history of adoption in 20th-century Germany. Dr. Spickermann participates in seminars for the advanced study program at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.

Associate Professor of History
washburn_j@utpb.edu

Dr. Washburn received his degrees from the University of Idaho (BA, MA) and the University of Mississippi (PhD). Dr. Washburn joined the UT Permian Basin History Department in the fall of 2020 after receiving his doctorate in the spring of the same year. His research focuses on the Native American experience during the 18th and 19th centuries. His current project explores Chickasaw economic history.

LengthCourses BeginCourses EndApplication DeadlineDocument DeadlineRegistration OpensRegistration DeadlinePayment DeadlineLast Day to Withdraw
Whole Spring1/10/225/6/2212/17/211/3/2211/1/211/19/211/7/223/25/22

LengthCourses BeginCourses EndApplication DeadlineDocument DeadlineRegistration OpensRegistration DeadlinePayment DeadlineLast Day to Withdraw
Whole Summer5/31/228/4/225/17/225/24/224/1/226/2/225/27/227/8/22

LengthCourses BeginCourses EndApplication DeadlineDocument DeadlineRegistration OpensRegistration DeadlinePayment DeadlineLast Day to Withdraw
Whole Fall 8/29/2212/16/228/15/228/22/224/1/229/7/228/26/2211/4/22
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