BS in Criminal Justice

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Criminal Justice Program Overview

Our online Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program was created for students who wish to protect and serve their community while bringing about constructive change to the criminal justice system from within. Through this comprehensive and affordable program, you’ll learn about all aspects of the criminal justice system including corrections, courts and law enforcement. Our program uses a multi-disciplinary approach, offering classes from other departments that work closely with the criminal justice profession. The program is comprised of a robust, research-based curriculum. Program courses are taught by faculty who have worked extensively in the criminal justice field. 

Whether you’re a student seeking a major in an increasingly topical field or a current criminal justice professional looking for new skills and credentials to set you apart, you’ll find this program invaluable. Current criminal justice professionals will also appreciate our flexible online courses that accommodate shift work and allow you to complete coursework at your convenience. When you finish your online program, you’ll receive the same respected degree as you would through our campus-based program.

Careers for BS in Criminal Justice Graduates

A BS in criminal justice from The University of Texas Permian Basin can help prepare you to succeed in a broad range of roles, including:

  • Probation Officer
  • Crime Scene Investigator
  • Forensic Science Technician
  • Child Protective Services Investigator
  • Correctional Officer
  • Police Officer
  • State Trooper


Check out the video below to see a UT Permian Basin alumna share her story:

 

Criminal Justice General Education

Students must complete 42 credits from the following areas of study to complete general education requirements. For Creative Arts - 3 sch are required, for Life/Physical Science - 8 sch are required. 3 or 4 Mathematic sch are required. If a 3 sch Mathematics course is selected, 1 sch is required as a Component area. For Social/Behavioral Science - 3 sch are required. See the catalog for the full list of options or reach out to a faculty member for questions about the courses for this program.

Courses
Duration
Credits
ENGL 1301 - Composition I
8 weeks
3
Composition I offers intensive instruction in the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, and proofreading), emphasizing the recursive nature of the process and the importance of the relationship among writer, audience, and subject. The course will also explore the connection between writing and critical thinking and the usefulness of writing as a tool for learning in all fields of knowledge. Students enrolling in Composition I will be expected to have a good command of standard written English.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022 Spring A 2022 Spring B 2022
ENGL 1302 - Composition II
8 weeks
3
Composition II covers argument, rhetorical analysis and the research paper. In this course students analyze and respond to texts of various kinds through essays and research papers. Students will learn to defend their points of view by using textual evidence and strong rhetoric. Readings and exercises help student learn to write broad-minded, well-informed essays in polished academic prose that moves and educates the reader.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 - Composition I
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Fall B 2021 Whole Spring 2022 Spring B 2022
HIST 1301 - History of the United States to 1877
8 weeks
3
A survey of major social, economic, and political developments in the United States from European colonization through Reconstruction.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
HIST 1302 - History of the United States Since 1877
8 weeks
3
A survey of major social, economic, and political developments in the United States from 1877 to the present.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
ENGL 2322 - British Literature to 1800
8 weeks
3
Chronological survey of major works in British Literature from Anglo-Saxon times, through the Restoration and late 18th century.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 - Composition II
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
ENGL 2323 - British Literature Since 1800
16 weeks
3
Chronological survey of major works of British Literature from the late 18th century (about 1800) to the Modern Period.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 - Composition II
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
ENGL 2327 - American Literature to 1865
8 weeks
3
Chronological examination of writers, works, and movements in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry through 1865.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 - Composition II
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
ENGL 2328 - American Literature Since 1865
16 weeks
3
Chronological examination of writers, works, and movements in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry from 1865 to the present.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1302 - Composition II
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
COMM 1301 - Introduction to the Study of Communication
8 weeks
3
An introductory course that surveys the history, development, and future directions of the field of communication. Equal emphasis is placed on understanding application of theory to everyday situations and learning introductory approaches to research.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Summer A 2022
MATH 1314 - College Algebra
8 weeks
4
Study of quadratics, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions; systems of equations; progressions; sequences and series; and matrices and determinants.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
MATH 1324 - Applications of Discrete Mathematics
8 weeks
4
Mathematics for modeling in the social and behavioral sciences. Topics include algebra, linear equations in two variables, and exponential and logarithmic functions. Other topics are chosen by the instructor. Course emphasizes application to social science and economics.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
MATH 1332 - Contemporary Mathematics I
8 weeks
3
Modern applications of mathematics including graph theory, optimization, data organization, and social decision models.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
MATH 2412 - Precalculus
8 weeks
4
College algebra (sets, functions, relations, logic), trigonometry (circular functions, logarithms, and exponential functions), and analytic geometry (standard form conic sections).
Prerequisites: MATH 1314 - College Algebra MATH 1324 - Applications of Discrete Mathematics
Semesters Offered: Whole Fall 2021 Whole Spring 2022
PLSC 2305 - American National Politics
8 weeks
3
An examination of American national political institutions and processes. Satisfies state requirement in U.S. government.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Summer A 2022
PLSC 2306 - State and Local Politics
8 weeks
3
An examination of state and local political institutions and processes. Satisfies state requirement in Texas government.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Summer B 2022
COMM 1315 - Introduction to Public Speaking
8 weeks
3
Introduces students to the theory and practice of public speaking, with an emphasis on invention, arrangement, and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches. Further emphasis is given to the reduction of anxieties associated with public speaking.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered: Fall A 2021 Spring A 2022 Summer A 2022 Fall B 2022
Criminal Justice Required Courses

The Bachelor in Science in Criminal Justice online requires a minimum of 27 hours (7 courses).

Courses
Duration
Credits
CCJO 2310 - Introduction to Criminal Justice
16 weeks
3
An overview of the entire criminal justice system: history and development, law enforcement, prosecution and defense, courts and trial processes, and corrections.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 3320 - Introduction to Research Methods
16 weeks
3
This course introduces students to the research methodology used in criminal justice research. Emphasis is on the development of a general understanding of why and how research can be and is conducted in the field of criminology and criminal justice.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4316 - Theories of Criminal Behavior
16 weeks
3
Principal theories of criminality and the criminal justice system and the application of these theories to the prevention and control of crime.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4430 - American Judicial Systems
16 weeks
3
Federal, state, and local judicial systems, with special emphasis on state trial courts having criminal jurisdiction. Court structure and function, court management, and judicial behavior.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4350 - Institutional Corrections
16 weeks
3
Examination and evaluation practices, issues and trends in institutional corrections. Emphasis is on administration, organization, and effectiveness of incarceration.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4356 - Probation and Parole
16 weeks
3
The history, philosophy, and development of adult and juvenile probation and parole in the United States are examined.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4364 - Police and the Community
16 weeks
3
Examination of the role of police in a democratic society. Topics include professionalism, police discretion, police-community relations, police-minority relations, use of force, and control of police behavior, as well as other selected contemporary issues.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
Criminal Justice Elective Courses

18 credit hours (6 courses). Electives are to be selected from the courses listed below.

Courses
Duration
Credits
CCJO 3312 - Criminal Justice Administration
16 weeks
3
Administrative problems and their solutions in correctional and law enforcement programs.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 3332 - Juvenile Delinquency
16 weeks
3
A study of the juvenile justice system, theories of causation, the distribution and frequency of delinquency, correctional treatments, and prevention programs in modern society.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 3345 - Child Abuse and Neglect
16 weeks
3
The overall objective of this course is help students develop an understanding of the various forms of child abuse, identify the underlying causes of this multifaceted problem, and to appropriately identify the types of services that will benefit maltreated children and their families. The nature and impact of child maltreatment, the ways in which society prevents or responds to it, and the system of responses to child maltreatment are addressed. The course will also cover the importance of promoting social and economic justice for the children and ways to empower children and their parents though the helping process.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4340 - Violence and Murder in the Family
16 weeks
3
This research-based seminar course is designed to explore issues surrounding the facets of family violence in greater depth in a formal academic setting than is possible in other structured courses offered in criminal justice. The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the theoretical paradigms examining the definitions of, causes or, and interventions for family violence with a specific emphasis on parents who kill their children/stepchildren.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4372 - Drugs and Behavior
16 weeks
3
This course explores the origins, categories, and treatments on mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders ranging from relatively mild stress and anxiety disorders to the more severe schizophrenias and organic mental disorders. This course is cross-listed with PSYC 4305 and SOCI4305.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4366 - Gangs
16 weeks
3
This course will provide an overview of street and prison gangs. It will cover gang structure, organization, and the relationship of individual gang members and the gang. This course will also cover current theoretical perspectives on gang behavior.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4381 - Ethics in Criminal Justice
16 weeks
3
An examination of major ethical issues confronted by persons who work in the criminal justice system. Important appellate court decisions pertaining to those issues will also be reviewed.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4389 - Selected Topics
16 weeks
3
Undergraduate courses which will be only offered once or will be offered infrequently or which are being developed before a regular listing in the catalog.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:
CCJO 4345 - Terrorism
16 weeks
3
This is an introductory course in terrorism. Covered topics include: definitions, origins and history, causes, the role of the media, types of terrorism (state, dissident, religious, international, and domestic), counter-terrorism, homeland security, and future trends.
Prerequisites: N/A
Semesters Offered:

Admission Requirements

In order to prevent delays in processing applications, UT Permian Basin is temporarily modifying the freshman admission process by moving to a test-optional policy for Spring 2021, Summer 2021, and Fall 2021. See the Test-Optional Policy section below for additional details.

Transfer Student Admission Requirements

  • Minimum of 24 transferable credit hours from a regionally accredited college or university
  • GPA of 2.0 or higher in previous college-level coursework
  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended
    • Dual-credit high school courses must be included
  • Completed application

Incoming Freshman Admission Requirements

If you have completed less than 24 hours of transferable college-level work from a regionally accredited college or university after graduating from high school or receiving your GED, please provide the following:

  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended (including dual-credit work while in high school)
  • Official high school transcript showing GPA, class rank, and expected graduation date or GED scores
  • SAT and/or ACT scores from within the last five years (see below for minimum score requirements)
  • Completed application

Official Transcripts

Official copies of transcripts must come directly from the school in a sealed envelope and should be mailed to:

UT Permian Basin
Office of Admissions
4901 E. University Blvd.
Odessa, TX 79762

Official transcripts in electronic format can be sent to admissions@utpb.edu.

Minimum Score Requirements for Freshman Admission

High School Graduation Class Rank SAT ACT
Top 25% No minimum score No minimum score
2nd Quarter 1020 20
3rd Quarter 1160 24
4th Quarter 1280 27

Application Fee

The application fee is $40.

If you are a freshman applicant, you may request a fee waiver when you apply by sending us your official college application fee waiver form provided by the SAT or ACT. You may also request a fee waiver if the Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) listed on your Student Aid Report is zero.

Test-Optional Policy

Students will be reviewed on a holistic basis focusing on the strength of the high school record, overall grade point average, grades within the core subjects, dual credit work, and additional information (resume and/or extracurricular activities, leadership opportunities, and work experience provided with the ApplyTexas application). We also recognize the value of standardized tests as a piece of the review process and will consider scores alongside the other required application credentials, if provided. 

Associate Professor
Coordinator, Criminology Program
College of Arts and Sciences
kiekbusch_r@utpb.edu

Dr. Kiekbusch is a jail operations specialist with 13 years of jail management experience in three different states. He was president of the American Jail Association from 1992-1993. He holds a BA, MA, and PhD in sociology from the University of Notre Dame. In addition to fulfilling his academic duties, Dr. Kiekbusch provides expert witness and other consulting services in the area of jail management. He also serves on editorial boards for multiple practitioner publications and scholarly journals.

Assistant Professor
Coordinator, Criminal Justice Administration (CJAD) Program
College of Arts and Sciences
fisher_j@utpb.edu

Dr. Fisher served in the U.S. Air Force during Desert Storm and has a background in private corrections and state probation. He earned his PhD in human services specializing in criminal justice from Walden University in 2016. At UT Permian Basin, he teaches criminal justice administration and behavioral analysis courses at the graduate and undergraduate levels. Dr. Fisher’s current research interests include polarization, extremism, and hate, specifically within the criminal justice system.

Associate Provost Academic Affairs
wilson_s@utpb.edu

Dr. Wilson is a military veteran and a former law enforcement officer with an administrative background in higher education. He earned his PhD in criminal justice at the University of Nebraska in 2005. He teaches courses related to law enforcement, management and supervision, research methods, and statistics at UT Permian Basin. Dr. Wilson’s research interests include improving attitudes toward the criminal justice system, police unions, and how organizations can decrease police officer victimization. In 2012 he received the James L. Madison Award for Best Published Article.

Lecturer
Coordinator, Criminal Justice Online (CCJO) Program
College of Arts and Sciences
hammon_g@utpb.edu

Professor Hammon teaches many of the UT Permian Basin criminal justice courses offered online. He received an undergraduate degree in criminology from The University of Texas Permian Basin in 1990 and earned his master's degree from Sul Ross State University in 1991. Professor Hammon has been teaching at the college level since 2001, both on campus and online. He has over 15 years of experience in law enforcement and earned a Master Peace Officer Proficiency Certification from the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement. Professor Hammon also has several years of experience in corrections and child protective services.

Adjunct Professor Criminal Justice
College of Arts and Sciences
gallivan_d@utpb.edu

After serving in the U.S. Air Force for four years, Mr. Gallivan earned a degree in finance from UT Permian Basin before attending Baylor Law School, where he earned his MBA. He has been an attorney for more than 20 years. Mr. Gallivan started off his career working with the Ector County District Attorney, where he prosecuted habitual criminals. Following that, he was in private practice for about 12 years, before going back to the Ector County District Attorney’s Office. He is currently the District Attorney for Ector County. In January 2016, Mr. Gallivan began his adjunct teaching career at UT Permian Basin, teaching eight different courses, including a graduate-level course.

Adjunct Professor Criminal Justice
College of Arts and Sciences
burton_t@utpb.edu

Mr. Burton began his 35-year law enforcement career in 1982 as a police officer for the city of Portland, Maine, attaining the title of police chief in 2005. In 2008, he accepted a position as chief of police for the city of Odessa, Texas and served in that capacity until retiring in 2017. His experience includes four years as a division commander, seven years as a bureau commander, and more than 12 years as a major city police chief. He is a recognized police policy expert and is also currently the criminal justice diversion manager for the National Alliance on Mental Illness in Massachusetts. Mr. Burton received a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology from the University of Southern Maine in 1991 and a Master of Science in Business from Husson University in 1996. He has eight years of experience teaching graduate-level business courses at Husson in addition to several years of teaching undergraduate criminal justice courses at Odessa College, York County Community College, and The University of Texas Permian Basin.

Adjunct Professor Criminal Justice
College of Arts and Sciences
coleman_h@utpb.edu

Henry Coleman has been a career fire and arson investigator. He’s held numerous positions with the Texas State Fire Marshal’s Office, worked as the Bexar County Fire Marshal and Emergency Management Coordinator, and Fire Prevention Administrator for the San Angelo Fire Department. While in San Antonio, he served on the Lonestar Fugitive Task Force with the United States Marshal’s Service. Mr. Coleman holds a bachelor’s degree in Criminal Justice from Texas State University, a master’s in Public Administration from Sul Ross State University, as well as a master’s in Criminal Justice, also from Sul Ross State University. Additionally, Mr. Coleman is a graduate of the National Fire Academy’s Executive Fire Officer Program. 

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Fall A8/23/2110/15/218/9/218/16/214/1/218/25/218/20/219/24/21
Fall B10/18/2112/10/2110/4/2110/11/214/1/2110/20/2110/15/2111/19/21
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Spring A1/10/223/4/2212/17/211/3/2211/1/211/12/221/7/222/11/22
Spring B3/14/225/6/222/28/223/7/2211/1/213/16/223/11/224/15/22
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Summer A5/9/226/24/224/25/225/2/224/1/225/11/225/6/226/10/22
Summer B6/27/228/11/226/13/226/20/224/1/226/29/226/24/227/29/22
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